MISSING RECORDS FROM WEBSTER BOOTH/ANNE ZIEGLER DISCOGRAPHY.

If anyone has any of the recordings listed below, I would be very glad to have an MP3 of any one of them so that I can add it to the list of recordings in this group.

Missing Recordings

I read a post in The Golden Age of British Dance Bands by Javier Soria Laso about a data bass on the internet: (http://www.kellydatabase.org/Entry.aspx). I discovered a number of recordings by Webster Booth which I had not seen before – some of them had never been released. He featured in recordings by the HMV Light Opera Company and the Light Opera Male Chorus, sometimes in the chorus and sometimes as a soloist. I have included these recordings in my original list of missing recordings.

I wonder whether the unreleased recordings are still in circulation or whether they were discarded by HMV. I have a recording of Beauty’s Eyes (Tosti) which is marked as unreleased, also Anne Ziegler’s test recording of the Waltz Song from Merrie England. Possibly they were obtained from the Booths’ private record collection.

If anyone has any of the recordings listed below, I would be very glad to have an MP3 of any one of them so that I can add it to the list of recordings in this group.

WEBSTER BOOTH: Test recordings Serenata, Macushla Webster Booth, Reginald Paul, C Studio, Small Queens Hall, London, 20 November 1929.

Here Comes the Bride Selection (Schwartz) Light Opera Company with Alice Moxon, Stuart Robertson, Webster Booth, George Baker/Ray Noble/Studio C, Small Queens Hall, London/Cc18897-4, 25 March 1930.

C1890 Three Musketeers: Vocal Gems (Friml, Grey & Woodhouse),  Queen of my heart, Your eyes, March of the Musketeersparts 1 and 2, C Studio, Small Queen’s Hall, London, 7 April 1930. LIGHT OPERA COMPANY, ORCHESTRA: RAY NOBLE,  ALICE MOXON soprano, BESSIE JONES soprano, NELLIE WALKER contralto, ESSIE ACKLAND contralto, WALTER GLYNNE tenor, WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, GEORGE BAKER baritone, STUART ROBERTSON bass-baritone.

C1920 C B Cochrane’s 1930 Revue: Vocal Gems, parts 1 and 2 : Piccadilly, With a song in my heart,  Heaven, All the things you do,  Part 2: Bakerloo, Just as we used to do, The wind in the willows, What became of Mary? C Studio, Small Queen’s Hall London,  16 May 1930.  LIGHT OPERA COMPANY, ORCHESTRA: RAY NOBLE,  BESSIE JONES soprano, Alice MOXON soprano, NELLIE WALKER contralto, ESSIE ACKLAND contralto, WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, WALTER GLYNNE tenor, GEORGE BAKER baritone, STUART ROBERTSON bass-baritone.

Decca K630 HMS Pinafore Vocal Gems/Gilbert and Sullivan, Anne Welch, Victor Conway, Doris Owens, Webster Booth (1931)

I’m alone because I love you (Joe Young)/ When it’s sunset on the Nile (Ray Ellison & Ted RenardKensington Cinema, London, 6 March 1931. WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, W. BRUCE-JAMES organ Not released by HMV.

C2229 White Horse Inn: Vocal gems (Benatzky-Stolz), parts 1:   White Horse Inn, My song of love, Your eyes; Part 2 Ho-Dri-Ho, Goodbye, Sigesmund, It would be wonderful, Small Queen’s Hall London,  8 May 1931/14 May 1931, LIGHT OPERA COMPANY, Orchestra: RAY NOBLE,  BESSIE JONES soprano, NELLIE WALKER soprano, ESSIE ACKLAND contalto, GEORGE BAKER baritone,  STUART ROBERTSON bass-baritone,JOHN TURNER tenor,WEBSTER BOOTH tenor.

I have this recording. Webster must feature in the chorus for his solo voice cannot be heard.

C2501 Musical Comedy Marches, No 2 Studio, Abbey Road London,  7 November 1932,
LIGHT OPERA COMPANY Orchestra: RAY NOBLE, JOHN TURNER tenor, WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, WALTER GLYNNE tenor, LEONARD GOWINGS tenor,  GEORGE BAKER baritone, STUART ROBERTSON bass-baritone, EDWARD HALLAND bass.

C2511 Robert Burns Medley, parts 1 and 2: My love is like a red red rose,Green grow the rashes-O, Afton Water, No 2 Studio, Abbey Road London, 5 December 1932, 
LIGHT OPERA COMPANY (orchestra: LAWRENCE COLLINGWOOD)  ALICE MOXON soprano, BESSIE JONES soprano, NELLIE WALKER soprano, ESSIE ACKLAND contralto, WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, WALTER GLYNNE tenor, GEORGE BAKER baritone, DENNIS ARUNDEL baritone.

C2716 Ballad Memories, Light Opera Company, including Peter Dawson, Webster Booth, Walter Glynne, George Baker, Gladys Peel, Essie Ackland. Date unknown.

Columbia DB 1658 ORCHESTRE RAYMONDE, with Webster Booth, tenor and Angela Parselles, soprano, Cond. George Walter (real name Walter Goehr) Date unknown.

B8078 A dream of paradise (Claude Littleton & Hamilton Gray)/The old rustic bridge by the mill (Joseph P Skelly) Kingsway Hall, London, 23 October 1933, WALTER GLYNNE tenor, CHORUS, organ HERBERT DAWSON (orchestra Lawrance COLLINGWOOD)  WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, JOHN TURNER tenor, EDWARD HALLAND baritone, PETER DAWSON bass-baritone, GEORGE BAKER baritone.

B8071 Sweet Genevieve (Tucker), solo STUART ROBERTSON;  At Trinity Church (Fred Gilbert), solo GEORGE BAKER; The honeysuckle and the bee (Fitz & Penn), solo STUART ROBERTSON; b) If you want to know the time (E W Rogers), solo GEORGE BAKER  Studio No 1, Abbey Road London England,  7 November 1933 LIGHT OPERA MALE CHORUS (orchestra: CLIFFORD GREENWOOD) WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, JOHN TURNER tenor, EDWARD HALLAND bass, LEONARD HUBBARD baritone.

This recording may be heard on Clypit: https://clyp.it/fjwbx5vs Thanks to Robert Godridge.

B8081 The saucy Arethusa (trad.), solo STUART ROBERTSON; The Bay of Biscay (Davy) Studio No 1, Abbey Road, London,  7 November 1933,
 LIGHT OPERA MALE CHORUS (orchestra CLIFFORD GREENWOOD)  WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, JOHN TURNER tenor, EDWARD HALLAND bass, LEONARD HUBBARD baritone

B8105 The glory of the Motherland (McCall); England (Besly); No 2 Studio, Abbey Road, London ,11 January 1934  PETER DAWSON bass-baritone (orchestra: CLIFFORD GREENWOOD), MALE QUARTET  JOHN TURNER, tenor, WEBSTER BOOTH tenor, GEORGE BAKER baritone, STUART ROBERTSON, bass.

C2814Neapolitan Nights, Selection sung in English: O sole mio; Torna; Funiculì Funiculà  Studio 1, London, 20 December 1935, LIGHT OPERA COMPANY, Orchestra: WALTER GOEHR,  INA SOUEZ (sop), WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Chorus 8 men

C2827 Tosti Medley Part 1: Parted; Marechiare; Vorrei morire; Part 2: L’ultima canzone; Ideale; Mattinata; Goodbye, Studio 1. London 11 February 1936, LIGHT OPERA COMPANY Orchestra: WALTER GOEHR,  INA SOUEZ (sop), WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Chorus 8 men (as La Scala Singers) Released1938?  

C2834 Spanish Medley, part 1 – Perjura; Lolita; La paloma; part 2 – La partida, El relicario; Ay ay ay, Studio 1, London, 10 February 1936 (as Sevillian Serenaders)
 LIGHT OPERA COMPANY (orchestra: WALTER GOEHR) INA SOUEZ (sop), WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Chorus 8 men.

Waltz song (German)/Indian love call (Friml) Studio 3, London ,10 March 1936,
 ANNE ZIEGLER (sop)(p) Test recordings.

B8476I’m all alone/May; I’ll wait for you/ May, Webster Booth, Conductor: George Scott-Wood, Studio 2, London, 21 July 1936, released December 1936, deleted July 1939.

September 1936Gramophone. Webster Booth is a little off colour this month in two songs by May and Feiner, I’m All Alone and I’ll Wait for You, both with orchestra on HMV B8476 (2S. 6d.), but this does not detract from the fact that Mr Booth is probably the finest light tenor before the public to-day. 

CARELESS RAPTURE Selection (Ivor Novello) Side 1.   Why Is There Ever Goodbye?/Music In May,   Side 2.   The Manchuko/Finale – Music In May. 23 October 1936.

Released in December 1936 and deleted in April 1941.

C2878 Memories of Lehár, part 1: You are my heart’s delight, Love’s melody, Smokeland, Gipsy love; part 2: Foreign Legion, Count of Luxembourg, Love’s melody  Studio 2, London, 23 October 1936, LIGHT OPERA COMPANY, soloists ERIKA STORM, WEBSTER BOOTH (ten), BBC Male Voice Quartet (orchestra: WALTER GOEHR)

Gems from Glamorous Night (Novello) Webster Booth, Muriel Barron (number and date unknown)

My star/Little Son (Bassett Silver),  Studio 1 London  10 February 1937 
 WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) (orchestra: CLIFFORD GREENWOOD) Unissued.

I was sent these recordings by Bassett Silver’s son.

You’re mine (Sievier, de Rance) Studio 1, London, 10 February 1937
 WEBSTER BOOTH (ten)(orchestra WALTER GOEHR) Unissued.

Lakmé: O fair vision (Delibes, trans Claude Aveling) London,3 March 1939 
WEBSTER BOOTH (ten), LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (WARWICK BRAITHWAITE) Unissued.

Soft and pure fraught with love (Flotow, trans Claude Aveling) London,  3 March 1939, 
WEBSTER BOOTH (ten), LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA:WARWICK BRAITHWAITE. Unissued.

Ave Maria/Schubert, Webster Booth (tenor) Ernest Lush (piano) 11 August 1939 Unpublished

DB 1877 MELODY OF THE WALTZ – Part 1: Waltzes by Gung’l; MELODY OF THE WALTZ; Part 2 : Waltzes by Gung’l, THE BOHEMIANS: light orchestra with Al Bollington at the Abbey Road studio Compton organ and Webster Booth, tenor. Released in October 1939 and deleted in February 1944.

B9030 Rosita (Kennedy/Carr)/When you wish upon a star (Harline & Washington)(Pinocchio)  Studio 1, London, 28 February 1940, WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) (orchestra CHARLES PRENTICE) Released April 1940. Deleted February 1944.

Rose of England: Crest of the Wave (Novello)/Beauty’s Eyes (F Paolo Tosti; F J Weatherley) Studio 3, London,27 March, 1941.
WEBSTER BOOTH (ten)(piano GERALD MOORE) Unissued.

I have Webster’s recording of Beauty’s Eyes by Tosti.

Merrie England: Come to Arcadie (German) Studio 3, London, 19 October 1941,

ANNE ZIEGLER (sop), WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) (orchestra: DEBROY SOMERS) Unissued.

July 1945 – War records Webster Booth, Sydney Burchall and Clarence Wright, sang in Songs Our Boys Sang and Marching Times.

These records were not for sale to the general public, but sets were available at most of the 5300 National Savings Centres throughout the Country. Further information was available from the National Savings Committee, Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith Street, SW1.

Oft in the stilly night (trad; Tom Moore)/There is no death (O’Hara; Johnstone) St Mark’s Church, Hamilton Terrace, London , 11 January,1946 , WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) (organ HERBERT DAWSON) Unissued. Webster also made a recording of There is no Death for HMV which was issued.

B9502All Soul’s Day/ Richard Strauss; Memory Island/ Harrison/ Gerald Moore, 27 February 1946. Released October 1946. Deleted March 1952. OEA10882/3

October 1946 Gramophone Webster Booth (tenor), Gerald Moore (piano): All Soul’s Day, opus No 8 (Bernhoff/Richard Strauss); Memory Island (Askew/Harrison) HMV B9502 (10”)

Richard Strauss’s setting of All Soul’s Day calls for singing of considerable emotional stress, and when Webster Booth gets impassioned his voice loses the easy charm that is its chief characteristic. His words are a model of distinctness and the accompaniment of Gerald Moore is perfect, but the song is not a very happy choice.

The singer is more at home in Memory Island, in which a sailor home from the sea for good, casts his memory back, Masefield-wise, to the blue lagoons, coral islands and what not of the rover. It is a nice song with, for its type, an unusually good accompaniment.

Without a song (V Youmans; W Rose and E Eluscu)/ My song goes round the world (E Neubach; English version K J Kennedy, ?Hans May) London,8 January 1948, 
WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Orchestra: ERIC ROBINSON Unissued.

If my songs were only winged (Reynaldo Hahn) London, 11 July 1950,  WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Orchestra: MARK LUBBOCK Unissued.

Countess Maritza: Komm Zigeuner (Kalman; McConnell)  London,20 December 1950,
WEBSTER BOOTH (ten) Orchestra: MARK LUBBOCK Unissued.

Decca F9921 Sanctuary of the Heart (Ketelby)He Bought My Heart At Calvary (Hamblen) with choir of St Stephen’s Church Dulwich, Fela Sowande (organ) June 1952

Jean Collen Updated: 10 September, 2019

EXTRACTS FROM MY TEENAGE DIARIES – MAY 1961

21 Juno Street, Kensington – our house at that time.

1 May – Picture of Anne in RDM at first night of the opera La Traviata. She looks quite gorgeous and not nearly 51! The two women with her are Mrs Bosman de Kok (husband is SABC musical director) and the pianist Adelaide Newman. They are probably far younger than Anne but she looks by far the best.

Anne at La Traviata with Mrs Bosman de Kock and Adelaide Newman

Song by Webster on radio If With All Your Hearts from Elijah. Beautiful song, lovely diction and wonderfully restrained.

2 May – College. Marion Levine gives an interesting talk about communism.

Go to studio once more. Webster answers door and takes me into the sacred presence who is very affable and I pay her. She asks if I can come next Monday because they’re arranging the programme for the ballet and have to be at the theatre at 7 o’clock every night, so can I come at 4 on Monday. She feels so embarrassed having to change me around all the time.

Webster brings me a cup of tea which I really need, and then we start on the lesson. Webster is very authoritative, and after singing scales he says I get down so low I should be a contralto. Anne retaliates and says (once again) that I’m a very high mezzo. “You mustn’t forget that high B!” Webster is stubborn and I don’t have any say in the matter at all. I sing “My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose…” and Webster sits facing me and criticises me. I must be more resonant on the low b and we practise this for ages. Webster gets up and gives a beautiful demonstration. Anne sings too – quite nasally – probably owing to the lowness of the note. As she says, it’s miles too low for her.

Webster then makes me sing from MessiahHe Shall Feed His Flock. Asks whether I can sight-read music. I say I can only do that on the piano and Anne says that it is exactly the same with her. She learnt to play the piano when she was six and could never sing at sight, but Webster is wonderful at that because he was trained to do it as a choir boy.  However, I sing this to accompaniment without hearing the tune and it is reasonable. Find the jump from high C to low C difficult and Webster is quite hurt because of his belief in my contralto abilities.

He says of one particular note, “If you could get all your notes like that one you would be a singer out of this world, Jean.”

One teeny-weeny compliment opposed to a thousand retributions. At one stage of the proceedings, he gets up from the chair and can hardly walk. He looks really agonised and I feel sorry him. It must be arthritis or some such ailment. Poor old Webster.

Take departure – all very affable. Must look over Ave Maria for next week. Anne says of noise, “God, just shut up for heaven’s sake.” Her nerves are sorely tried – shame. She wears a lovely tweed suit with brown jersey and little furry collar and looks lovely, but she would never do to be anybody’s mother because she doesn’t look half her age and she’d steal her daughter’s boyfriends. But she is a honey all the same.

3 May – College during the day and then we go to the opera at night. What can I say of opera? Mimi Coertse has a voice like a bell. With what seems like little effort she sends out notes that ripple and thrill. She plays her part well with great feeling and her high notes are really excellent.

Bob Borowsky as her baritone father is the only other cast member who sings really well but he lacks expression and tends to be lugubrious. The chorus, in my opinion, is bad. The tenor was sweet at times but his voice grew very throaty towards the end.

4 May – College. We go to lunch hour concert. The soloist is young pianist, Yonti Solomon who is really brilliant. He plays a Schumann concerto with Edgar Cree conducting.

At the moment I’m lying in bed waiting for Webster’s programme. Introduces it with the usual, “Hello everyone,” in honeyed accents. First he plays the Jennifer Vyvyan recording of Rejoice Greatly conducted by Sir Thomas B and says, “Here it is, so hold yer breath!”

Next he talks about the opera and how nice it was and plays an aria from Rigoletto sung by Mimi Coertse and George Fourie. He then plays record by instrumentalists including Maxie Goldberg. “What a name to say with a cold in the nose!” says Webster! Next the Fledermaus with the Melachrino strings and then he reverts back to oratorio.  He talks about Kathleen Ferrier who lived opposite them in their home in Frognal and who used to entertain them with Lancashire stories. During her long illness, they used to visit her often. He plays her recording of Father of Heav’n and I lie in bed and cry during the whole recording. Her voice is beautiful and rich. No wonder she was considered the greatest contralto in the world. From her letters in her biography she seemed a lovely, adorable creature, one I would have loved to have known but never shall. It is so sad that she died at such an early age.

He then plays his own recording of Sound an Alarm also from Judas Maccabeus and it is excellent.  He introduces the Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore and says that Gilbert made a great parody of this and sings a snatch of it from Pirates of PenzanceCome Friends, Who Plough the Sea…  His last recording is the overture to the Pirates and then goodbye for another week.

6 May – We see Elmer Gantry in the afternoon. Burt Lancaster and Jean Simmons. Best picture I’ve seen for ages, adapted from the book by Sinclair Lewis – shades of Miss Scott who told us all about Sinclair Lewis.

7 May Go to Diamonds in the afternoon. They play records – tenors, tenors, tenors – mainly Kenneth McKellar – obviously their favoroute!

8 May College again. Shorthand and typing are blooming dull.

I am transported in the afternoon when I go for singing lesson. Webster answers the door and shows me into the kitchen. Anne is on the phone talking to a girl, Mary about her lessons. Webster goes into the studio and informs her of my arrival. She greets me and then disappears once more, has an argument with Webster about the credit note he got from the bottle store for 8 dozen bottles at 3d each – I ask you! I think Anne realises that I am actually there and innocent to the horrors of the bottle store, so while Webster has a late lunch, Anne makes a second entrance and says, “Well, my little one, and how are you and what are you doing with yourself these days?”

I say I’m still at college which sounds infernally dull. She asks what I thought about the opera. I say that I adored Mimi but wasn’t too fond of the French tenor. Anne says, “He’s only a baby of 23 so the two roles were a bit much for him.” Webster says that the role was far too heavy for him anyway. She says, “Weren’t the scenery and costumes terrible?” I didn’t actually think so, but what do I know?

The letters arrive and Anne is quite excited that they have been asked to do a concert tour to Witbank and various other towns in that area. I hope they don’t go! Anne says she wants to ask me a question and can’t wait to see my face, and insists that he sees it too. Would I like to enter the Afrikaans eisteddfod? I grimace wildly and Webster says, “Her profile was enough!” I don’t commit myself however and Anne says that I could enter the ballad section and sing The Lass with the Delicate Air. She says, “Get it anyway and you can see what you think. It’ll be good for you and get you moving.”

I do scales and Anne says I must look happy about them and takes me over to that damned mirror and makes me sing a scale happily. I can’t! She says, “Do it just for me, Jean, dear. I mean this quite sincerely.” Will try.

Webster makes tea for us and I say, “Thank you, Webster,” and Anne says, “Thank you – waiter!” Webster doesn’t look very happy about this. I sing Roslein and it is pulled to pieces again, mainly by Webster who says I show my teeth too much and says he can’t show his when he’s singing. He tries and succeeds in showing a horrible set of teeth altogether. No matter, we proceed and all goes better. At the end of the lesson my little “friend” Roselle arrives and we smile at one another when I leave. Anne asks if I’m going to the ballet and I say, “No.” Rather blunt but true – I loathe ballet anyway.

11 May – Sunday school picnic – walking, standing and working!  Listen to Webster at night. He starts with He Shall Feed His Flock by Norma Procter, a contralto with whom he sang a few years ago and thinks could be a worthy successor to Kathleen Ferrier. He plays a record by Roy Henderson who trained both Kathleen Ferrier and Norma Procter and was chorus master of the Huddersfield Choral Society. He says he has a sweet small voice with perfect diction.

He talks about Mrs Fenney who stood in for Miss Heller at Jeppe for a term. “Anne and I had the pleasure of putting Mabel Fenney through to a scholarship to study lieder in Berlin and she and Anne worked very hard on the set piece by Bach.” He plays this piece sung by Margaret Balfour.

Mabel Fenney (1959)

He goes on to the opera Samson – the opera, and goes into all the gory details of the plot and says, “Nice people!” Plays an excerpt from the opera by Jan Peerce. Then comes music from Schubert’s Rosamunde and after that his own recording – excerpts from Carmen with himself, Dennis Noble, Nancy Evans and Noel Eadie – lovely.

14 May – Church. Dull and unimaginative with sermon by Mr R and ravings from Peter about Song Without End. Shorty gives Doreen and me a lift to her house where I have tea and we run down the camp concert committee and the Lombard family!  Play piano and sing. Dad has a cold and I’m heading in that direction too.

16 May Cold is still rotten so I am absent from college and any idea of going for singing lesson is curtailed.  About midday I phone in bleary-eyed fashion to Booth’s house. Woman answers the phone and I ask, “Is that Anne?”

She answers, “No, this is Anne’s maid.”

“Oh, I’m sorry. Is Anne there?”

“No, they’re both at the studio. Do you know the number?”

“Yes, thanks. Goodbye.”

I must have spoken to Hilda, their St Helena maid. She sounds remarkably well-spoken.  Phone the studio and Anne answers.

“Is that Anne?”

“Yes!” in startled tones.

“This is Jean speaking.” (Vague affirmation)

“Anne, I’m terribly sorry but I have a horrible cold so I shan’t be able to come today.”

“Oh, Jean, I’m so sorry. Are you in bed?”

“Yes.”

“I don’t know how I can make the lesson up to you” (Pause) “But there are five Tuesdays in this month.”

“Yes, that’s what I was thinking.”

“Then we’ll see you next week? I can hear you talking through a cold. I do hope you feel better soon.”

“Thank you – and I’m sorry, Anne.”

Pause “Yes, so am I! Goodbye, Jean”

Goodbye.”

Spend a miserable day.

17 May – Retire to bed permanently! Voice practically non-existent. Minister comes in the evening but I remain silent and still.

18 May – Still in bed.  Listen to Webster at night which is cheering. The first record (not obtainable here) was lent to him –  Requiem by Verdi, written after the death of Rossini. He says that he’ll play an extract each week. It contains arias sung by his favourite tenor (Jussi Bjorling?). He plays a choral piece – Sanctus.

The next record is from Elijah, Oh, Come Everyone That Thirsteth by a quartet – Isobel Baillie, Harold Williams, Gladys Ripley and James Johnston. What a wonderful recording. Next is an aria from the work by Webster with the London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Warwick Braithwaite – often cut from the oratorio. His voice is just perfect. There can hardly be another tenor in this century – and I do believe this – to touch his voice at its best!  Next is the overture to the Magic Flute, written by Mozart in “Viennar” – intrusive r terribly and wrongly distinct. He says that this was considered his best work.

He then plays an aria from the opera by Oscar Natzke… Then some more Mozart sung by “that versatile young singer”, Elisabeth Schwartzkopf.  He reverts to operetta – The Chocolate Soldier and says, “Anne and I have sung in The Chocolate Soldier many times. It is an adaptation of Shaw’s Arms and the Man, as My Fair Lady is an adaptation of Pygmalion but I do wonder whether we shall hear My Fair Lady fifty years hence as often as we hear the Chocolate Soldier now.  Plays the duet Sympathy with Risé Stevens and someone else. Then, says Webster, “Let’s play out with The Gypsy Baron. Very nice programme indeed. Webster has a slight wheeze tonight.

19 May – Still ill – until 22 May!

23 May –   Manage to go to college once more after a cold and go to the studio in the afternoon.  Anne ushers me into kitchen while they usher two old women – very old-maidish – out, while they chat brightly about the best radiograms to buy. Webster answers them in very indifferent tones. They depart, having thanked them too, too eloquently for sparing some of their valuable time. They call me in and Anne says, “God – we’ll need another cup of tea after that. Will you have one too, Jean?” “Yes, thank you, Anne.”

She says that the women took an awful lot out of her. She says I still sound very nasal after the cold. Convinces me that I am just about dying of illness! We start on scales and all goes reasonably well. Webster says I shall never need my very high or very low notes.

Anne tells me over tea that the tiny dilapidated cottage they bought two years ago and redecorated themselves needed fresh plaster above the curtain rails in the hall, so she spent the weekend on top of a ladder, scraping old plaster off, and as she was literally breathing plaster, she doesn’t know how she is managing to talk today. Webster says dryly, “It must be all the liquid refreshment you had while you were doing it.” Anne pauses and replies, “Oh, yes, I had plenty of tea, coffee, cocoa and – an occasional gin and tonic to go with it!” Another dramatic pause and then she asks, “Do you like gin, Jean?” I say that it’s not very nice. “Don’t you even like sherry?” “No.” “Do you smoke?” “No.” “Well don’t ever develop any of those bad habits.”

We go on with singing The Lass With the Delicate Air. Webster mimics all my mistakes mercilessly and makes me laugh. He says that my “delicate air” sounds like “delicatessen” – the height of insult!

We go on with the song and Anne says, “Watch the time,” and I think she had said, “What’s the time?” I say “Twenty past four!” She says, “That was well picked up!” I stare in confusion and she tells me what she had said and we have a good laugh. Finish with Roslein and Webster says I open my mouth too wide for low notes – a good fault – but it will take too much out of me to do it.

Anne asks if I can come next Monday instead of Tuesday as an uprising by natives before Republic Day is forecast. They have to go to Durban to give a concert on Wednesday and don’t know what they will do if there should be an uprising. That doesn’t strike me until I leave that Wednesday is Republic Day. I hope that they will be safe. Say goodbye (cheerio) effusively and see Roselle, whom I always feel is a far better singer than me.  Play piano, sing and listen to radio – Ivor Dennis and Douggie Laws at night.

25 May – College. Go with Jill and Audrey to the lunch hour concert. The soloist is Laura (someone) – a pianist of insignificant looks but with very significant playing!

At night I decide to go to choir practice at church. All make a pretence of being happy to see me. I sit next to Joan Spargo and make myself as insignificant as possible. Ann’s father, Mr Stratton is the choir leader. He certainly has a resounding voice and mimics everyone’s musical and vocal faults aptly.

Come home and listen to Webster on wireless. He starts off with Dies Irae (from that rare recording of last week with chorus and bass (George Tsotsi) with Vienna Philharmonic. “It’s a bit noisy, so I suggest you close the children’s bedroom door!”

Webster plays his own record – a Recitative from Jephtha which is quite gorgeous – every word as clear as day. He goes into some detail about the finale of Samson and Delilah which, says Webster, is “very awer inspiring!” The singers are Rise Stevens, Robert Merrill and Jan Peerce.

He plays a record by Dawie Couzyn from Magic Flute and says that he thought this production was better than Don Pasquale. DC sings it in Afrikaans with horrible diction and a clicky quality to his voice. Not terribly enjoyable.  Webster plays complete selection from The Desert Song which Springs Operatic is doing soon, sung by Gordon McRae and Lucille Norman. He says, “Shades of my old friends, Harry Welchman and Edith Day.”

He ends with the overture to Ruddigore – about a witch who forced a family to commit a crime a day – Nice folk! And then, goodbye and so to bed.

26 May College – we have a party for Terry French who is going overseas soon.

27 May – Go into town in the morning and am stopped by terribly handsome young German student who was selling postcards. I buy one, of course!  Go to Kelly’s and buy Where E’er You Walk by Handel, a most gorgeous song!

Have lunch in Capinero with Mum and Dad and then we go to the Empire. In the powder room I meet Pat Eastwood looking terribly smart with bouffant hairdo and also a bit fatter. She is most affable and says, “I haven’t seen you for ages. When are you coming to the rink?”

I say, “Oh, yes, I must come soon…” How lovely to talk so casually to the South African figure skating champion and Springbok.

We see The Great Imposter with Tony Curtis – very good.

28 May In Gary Allighan’s radio crit this morning, he says, “Praise be to Webster Booth, whose On Wings of Song combines familiar music with personal reminiscences, although he should not be so modestly sparse with his own songs.”  Shot for good old GA! He’s a man after my own heart – politically and artistically.

Gary Allighan

Anne phones just afterwards and greets father with, “Mr Campbell, this is Anne Ziegler here. Can I speak to Jean please. I am called to the phone and informed by Anne, after she asks how I am, that she’d like me to come at 4.30 instead of at 4. Would this be convenient? “Certainly.” “Are you sure?”….Sing in choir at church at night. All convivial.

29 May – First day of strike evidently a flop as there are no strikers to be seen.  I go to the studio in the afternoon and Webster asks me to have a seat for a while and pour myself some tea. I do this and drink tea feeling terrible blasé, and wash the cup afterwards. He plays over tape recording which is rather funny. I giggle to myself.

Anne comes from nowhere and is charming. She tells me to go in and she’ll be with me in a few moments. I look closely at pictures of the royal family at their performance – King George, Queen Mother and the princesses.  Webster talks to me about the strike and says that RCA have no workers but Decca have all their workers. He says the town is nice and quiet with not so many people around. We talk about the success of receiving papers and milk and Webster says direfully, “Tonight will be the crucial deciding time. Just as long as they don’t come out and kill us is all I hope for.” Cheery attitude to life this!

Anne returns and we start with scales and they are thrilled at the new quality of my voice and ask what I’ve been doing to bring about the improvement. I sing Roslein to them and they continue to be quite happy about it all – 2 hours practice a day must help. Feel quite embarrassed.

Webster makes me sing He Shall Feed His Flock for all the low notes and sings this along with me – gorgeous! During Lass With the Delicate Air there are many faults. I crack on middle C on “fill” and Webster makes me do it over and over again and takes me over to the mirror to show me how to produce it correctly. When I sing it again he suddenly doubles up on the piano with a look of agony on his face. Anne looks horrified and says, “What’s the matter?” He doesn’t speak for a moment and then says, “Nothing. I just wanted to listen to Jean sing.” Do not for a moment believe this – poor Webster. He recovers and says I must emphasise “gin” in virgin and sings “virgin” and then “pink gin”! Anne and I nearly die laughing. Anne writes down next to it “pink gin!” She says that my diction is generally good. He sings O, Thou That Tellest from Messiah. She asks whether I’d like to do some oratorio. Tells me about a singer in Don Pasquale and says that she couldn’t hear for about five or ten minutes what language she was singing in, her diction was so bad!

Webster goes down to bring the car nearer to the studio and Anne goes on with the lesson – she gives me a whole hour. She feels my breathing and says that my bust mustn’t move and I must watch it. Gives me a demonstration of her own breathing. If I could even breathe like her, I’d be very happy.

I leave at 5.30 and she tells me that she’s going to Durban for a concert at the weekend and tomorrow they have a show at Wanderers. During lesson Webster asks, “Where’s that contralto album Mabel left us?” I meet him coming from the car and we say goodbye and “Hope there’ll be no riots!”

Durban concert

MEDLEYS AND BROADCASTS FROM THE WEBSTER BOOTH-ANNE ZIEGLER GROUP

The Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler Appreciation Group on Facebook has acquired most of the recordings made by Webster and Anne. Until we come across some of the missing recordings (only about 10 sides to go now) I am creating medleys for the group. Most of them last about half-an-hour and feature AZ-WB recordings and recordings by related artists

I did an interview about Webster and Anne with Clare Marshall on Radio Today on 28 April 2013. You can listen to it here.

The Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler Appreciation Group on Facebook has acquired most of the recordings made by Webster and Anne. Until we come across some of the missing recordings (only about 10 sides to go now) I have been creating medleys for the group. Most of them last about half-an-hour and feature AZ-WB recordings and recordings by artists associated with them. Click on the links to listen to them and please let me know what you think of them.

Going through these medleys I see that not many people have listened to them. Although I enjoy compiling the medleys, just as I enjoy listening to them myself, it seems that I am fighting an increasingly losing battle in trying to promote the recordings of Webster, Anne and related artists. I will add more medleys if any interest is shown in the ones I have uploaded here.

August medley featuring Alfredo Campoli (violin), Webster Booth, Anne Ziegler and, Charles Ernesco https://clyp.it/d4itz5dn  

Albert Sandler (violin), Anne and Webster, Rawicz and Landauer (piano)

20 May 1944, Harold Fielding Concert at Albert Hall  https://clyp.it/gtw3hjp0

Gwen Catley, Webster Booth, Dennis Noble
C3369 Rigoletto/ Caro Nome/Dearest Name/Verdi, Gwen Catley, La Bohème/ In a Coupé/ Puccini, with Webster Booth/ Dennis Noble; Rigoletto, Hallé Orchestra, Warwick Braithwaite, Holdsworth Hall,

Manchester 29 August 1942  https://clyp.it/zbp5cicv

Broadcast 4 December 1927 Some of the songs featured – most by Webster Booth, one by Jan Peerce (A Dream)  https://clyp.it/a5lii3hg 
A Good Friday selection Webster Booth sings “Abide With Me”, two arias from “Messiah” and “There is no Death”. He sang his first Good Friday “Messiah” at the Albert Hall on Good Friday, 10 April 1936 https://clyp.it/2pjvsgv3
Four songs for St George’s Day. I Leave My Heart in an English Garden, England, Mother England, There’s a Land, The English Rose. Each song has been shared before.  https://clyp.it/2rcg0qyo
Webster Booth, Alfredo Campoli (violin)
Alfredo Campoli and Webster Booth combine in a medley for violin and voice. Tell me tonight/Ah sweet mystery of life https://clyp.it/ssuybzfn

Webster Booth
Beneath Her Window – a Serenade Medley Webster Booth (Voice), Herbert Dawson (organ), orchestra conducted by Walter Goehr. Recorded in 1938 HMV C3051 https://clyp.it/5try4jji
July Medley: Hugo Rignold, Webster Booth
July Medley: All the world is waiting for the sunrise (Seitz), played by P. Sears from YouTube, Castles in the air (WB), Dance of the Wooden Dolls, Side by Side (Melville Gideon from the Co-optimists), Always (WB), Poor Butterfly (Hugo Rignold), Drinking song (WB). https://clyp.it/hct1upr2
June medley: Gypsy Moon, Still as the night, Loch Lomond, We’ll Gather Lilacs, Ivor Novello medley, Waltz Medley, ‘Tis the Day, featuring Alfredo Campoli, Anne and Webster, Fred Hartley, Rawicz and Landauer, Kathryn Rudge. https://clyp.it/olllrro1
Medley to celebrate the eightieth wedding anniversary of Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler. 5 November 1938 Anniversary Medley

2018-12-06_173818

Harold Williams, Malcolm McEachern and Webster sing a medley to commemorate Hundredth anniversary of Armistice Day (2018)

Harold Williams, Malcolm McEachern, Webster Booth
 
.
December 2018 Medley – Alfredo Campoli, Webster Booth, Rawicz and Landauer, Harold William and Malcolm McEachern
Campoli, Webster Booth, Rawicz and Landauer, Harold Williams, Malcolm McEachern in a selection for December  December Medley
A few romantic songs recorded in the 1930s and 1940s sung by Webster Booth. Restored from 78rpm records by Mike Taylor. My Love and I Stand Alone, Pale Moon, Come Back My Love to Me, Sweet Melody of Night. Romantic Songs sung by Webster Booth

2018-12-13_215022

2018-12-06_175732
Anne and Webster playing with pets, Smokey and Woofenpoof in their garden (1953)
 
Christmas 2018 medley: When Big Ben Chimes, The Holy City, The Little Road to Bethlehem, Silent Night (with Anne Ziegler), The Star of Bethlehem, O, Come All Ye Faithful. Christmas Medley (2018)
January medley 2019 Alfredo Campoli, Webster Booth, Rawicz and Landauer

January Medley – 2019: Webster Booth, Alfredo Campoli, and Rawicz and Landauer perform the January medley. Eric Coates selection, Everywhere I go (WB), Poeme (Fibich), Sylvia (WB), Fledermaus (R&L), I Bless the Day (WB) January Medley – 2019

 
Webster Booth (1937)
Webster Booth Birthday medley 2019: La Serenata (Salon Music)

Sylvia WB, Homing WB, On Wings of Song (instrumental), The Nightingale WB, On wings of Song WB, Moonbeams Dance (Carroll Gibbons)

February medley 2019

Serenade (Frasquita) WB, A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square (Japie Human), Just for Today (WB), Fascination (JH), Show Me the Way (WB), Dreaming (Salon Orchestra)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is wbjh.jpg

Webster and Japie Human.

My Star (Bassett Silver) BBC Home Service broadcast. My Star (Bassett Silver) sung by Webster Booth on Music Hall (BBC Home Service broadcast) 26 April 1949. https://clyp.it/a5esqa5h

March Medley – Alfredo Campoli, Anne, Webster, Fred Hartley Poupée Valse Alfredo Campoli, Slumber Song (Schumann) AZ, Arioso (Bach) Campoli, I love thee (Grieg) WB, My Star (Bassett Silver) WB, Mystic Beauty (Fred Hartley): https://clyp.it/ezoipuro

Medley featuring Alfredo Campoli, Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler. Softly awakes my heart (AC), Bless this house (WB), The Poplar Tree (AZ), Gypsy Moon (AC), You are my heart’s delight (WB), Tell Me Tonight (AC). https://clyp.it/3xfdjwvd

Songs I Like, by Webster Booth. 14 September 1938. Broadcast. Not all the songs from the broadcast have been located. https://clyp.it/zhlyqgut

Morgen (Strauss)/Come into the Garden, Maud (Balfe) Recorded in January 1945 HMV C3418. Webster Booth, accompanied by Ernest Lush and Alfredo Campoli. Both records restored by Mike Taylor. https://clyp.it/2sfecfdh

Song of the Vagabonds (WB), Smilin’ Through (WB), Laat Ons nie van Liefde Weer Praat nie (WB/AZ), Showboat medley (Billy Mayerl), Just a Little Love, a Little Kiss (WB), Shine Through My Dreams, Love is My Reason (WB) https://clyp.it/giydvsrz

April 2019 medley: Scipio march (Mortimer), Let Me Dream in Your Arms Again (WB), Love is My Song (WB), Demande et Reponse (Albert Sandler), Stay with Me Forever (WB) (If You are There) Scottish medley (Debroy Somers) https://clyp.it/4utgof3k

May 2019 Loch Lomond medley (Debroy Somers) Love is the key to all glory (AZ/WB) Greensleeves (WB), Gay Vienna (Robert Naylor) Sweethearts/One Day When We Were Young (WB) Dear Miss Phoebe selection ( Parr-Davies) I am grateful to Mike Taylor for several of these fine restorations. https://clyp.it/yv0yjszk

Robert Naylor, Anne and Webster, Debroy Somers.

https://clyp.it/3tt4axbh May 2019 Waltz Time medley (Hans May) Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth (1945/1947) Albert Sandler on Violin.

Anne and Webster in the film “Waltz Time”
Mid-May Medley: Musette (Hartley), Come Back My Love (WB), Lehar medley (WB/AZ), Pomone Waltz (Albert Sandler), Show Me the Way (WB), Fledermaus fantasy (Rawicz and Landauer)
Medley 29 May 2019 Horse Guards Whitehall, Giannina Mia WB, No, My Heart will Never Sing Again, Autumn Dream (Sydney Torch), May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You (WB), White Horse Inn medley (Peggy Cochrane)
posted 19 days ago
Remembering Webster Booth on the 35th anniversary of his death on 21 June, and Anne Ziegler on the 109th anniversary of her birth on 22 June. https://clyp.it/osk1chdz Click on the link to listen to the anniversary medley.
Webster Booth (1936) Hornpipe medley: Hornpipe (Eric Coates), Say That You are Mine, Glow Worm Idyll (Paul Linke), Sylvia, The Whistler and His Dog (Harry Mortimer), Trees, Rendezvous (Brooklyn Ensemble) Danny Boy, Nights of Gladness (Harry Mortimer) https://clyp.it/giu4fb5d
27 June 2019 medley – Down the mall (Charles Shadwell), May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You, There is no Death, A Love Song, (Charles Williams), Just for Today, Dusk (Armstrong Gibbs), Homing, Music Everywhere (Coates), Webster Booth and bands. https://clyp.it/r3zlxbkz
1 July 2019 Hornpipe medley: Hornpipe (Eric Coates), Say That You are Mine, Glow Worm Idyll (Paul Linke), Sylvia, The Whistler and His Dog (Harry Mortimer), Trees, Rendezvous (Brooklyn Ensemble) Danny Boy, Nights of Gladness (Harry Mortimer) https://clyp.it/giu4fb5d
Irish medley 8 July 2019: Irish medley (Debroy Somers), The Snowy-breasted Pearl, Lullaby (Cyril Scott), Macushla, Trees (Julian Lloyd Webber). Irish medley with Webster Booth, Over to You (Eric Coates) https://clyp.it/jrdkmikj

WEBSTER BOOTH BROADCASTS (1940 – 1945)

 

Join: The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends on Facebook.

Share/Bookmark

 

Thursday, 4 January 1940. 22.35 ENTERTAINMENT MUSIC played by the BBC Theatre Orchestra (leader, Tate Gilder ), Conductor, Stanford Robinson with Gwen Catley and Webster Booth, Wilfrid Parry and Charles Groves (pianofortes) and the BBC Theatre Chorus (trained by Charles Groves).

MUSIC IN THE EVENINGBBC Home Service Basic, 15 January 1940 18.35 with
Alan Paul  – A programme of music of a quiet nature .Singers: Dorothy Carless, Three in Harmony, Webster Booth.
The Players: Jean Pougnet , David Wise, Frederick Riddle, Anthony Pini , Victor Watson , John Cockerill , Arthur Gleghorn , Leon Goossens, Reginald Kell, Andrew Walkowski , Dennis Gomm. All arrangements by Alan Paul, devised and presented by John Burnaby and Alan Paul
Selected by Mark H. Lubbock and played by the BBC Theatre Orchestra – leader, Tate Gilder,conductor, Stanford Robinson. Gwen Catley ,Webster BoothWilfrid Parry and Charles Gloves (pianofortes), the Alfredo Campoli Trio, BBC Theatre Chorus (trained by Charles Groves)
SATURDAY AT NINE-THIRTY’ – BBC Home Service Basic, 27 January 1940 21.30
The story of the Popular Song with Marjorie Westbury, Webster Booth, John Rorke, The BBC Theatre Chorus (trained by Charles Groves), The BBC Theatre Orchestra (leader, Tate Gilder). The programme presented and conducted by Mark H. Lubbock.
Evelyn Dall (by permission of Bert Ambrose), Webster Booth, and John Bentley in General ReleaseSongs from current and forthcoming film issues with the Radio Graces, the BBC Theatre Chorus (trained by Charles Groves), BBC Theatre Orchestra (leader, Tate Gilder) The programme arranged and conducted by Reginald Burston, Compere, Hugh Morton.
Keen filmgoers, as well as many other listeners, will be interested to know that for this programme Reginald Burston has persuaded the producers and Jack Hylton to release the original scores of the new Band Waggon film, and Alexander Korda has released the original score of the incidental music for The Four FeathersAnother point of interest about the production is that Evelyn Dall , the popular dance-band  vocalist, is entering a new field, so far as sound broadcasting is concerned.
THE STORY OF THE POPULAR SONG – Forces Programme, 21 February 1940 21.45Devised and written by M. Willson Disher with  Marjorie Westbury, Webster Booth, John Rorke, The BBC Theatre Chorus (Trained by Charles Groves), The BBC Theatre Orchestra (Leader, Tate Gilder), The programme presented and conducted by Mark H. Lubbock.
SATURDAY AT NINE-THIRTY-FIVE – BBC Home Service Basic, 13 April 1940 21.35
Listeners’ Request Night with Webster Booth. The BBC Theatre Orchestra, Leader, Tate Gilder, Conducted by Harold Lowe.
A musical comedy/operetta by Bruno Hardt Warden. 
The music by Robert Stolz. Adapted for broadcasting from the English version by Holt Marvell, Hassard Short, Desmond Carter, and Reginald Purdell. The BBC Theatre Chorus (trained by Charles Groves). The BBC Theatre Orchestra, Leader, Tate Gilder, Conducted by Reginald Burston, Production by Martyn C. Webster.
Wild Violets was originally produced at Drury Lane in 1932. Set in Switzerland and involving all the best ingredients of melody and romance, it has one of the most tuneful scores written for the theatre during recent years, as most will agree who remember such numbers as You, just you, A girl has got my heart, and Don’t say good-bye.
Augusta: Dorothy Paul
Hans: Ernest Butcher
Greta, their daughter: Meg Titheradge
Otto Bergmann: Frank Drew,
Paul Hoffman: Webster Booth
Carl Hoffman, Paul’s son: Dudley Rolph
Erik Schmidt: Patrick Waddington
Madame Hoffman, Headmistress of the Chateau Violette: Dorothy Summers Mile.
Yvonne Duprez, assistant mistress at the Chateau: Yvette Damac.
Liesel: Marjorie Westbury
Mitzi:Billie Baker
Lena:Helen Crerar
Augusta, maid at the Chateau: Dorothy Paul
Hans,her sweetheart: Ernest Butcher
Mary Rutherford, the new girl from England: Heather Boys
Algernon Rutherford, her grandfather: Edgar Norfolk
Dr. Franck, music-master at the Chateau: John Morley
The narrator: Stuart Vinden.

21st October 1940Programme for the forces. 11.0 William Murdoch (Piano), Webster Booth (Tenor), Josef Hassid (Violin), Bruce Dargavel (Baritone).

17 November 1940 BBC THEATRE ORCHESTRA visits a West of England town. Popular concert by Stanford Robinson and BBC Theatre Orchestra supported by BBC Theatre Chorus, Olga Haley (soprano), Webster Booth (tenor), Jack Mackintosh (comet virtuoso)

for members of H.M. Forces (with their sweethearts and wives) given by The BBC Salon Orchestra, Leader, Jean Pougnet, Conductor, Leslie Bridgewater.
Margaret Eaves, Helen Clare, Webster Booth
and  Fredric Bayco at the organ.
 Introduced by Lionel Gamlin from  a West-Country concert hall.
The first part of the oratorio by Handel.  performance by the Huddersfield Choral Society – Chorus Master, Herbert Bardgett. Janet Hamilton-Smith (soprano), Maud Heaton (contralto), Webster Booth (tenor), Keith Falkner (bass).
The Society’s Orchestra, Leader, Reginald Stead. Conductor, Malcolm Sargent,
From a Northern concert hall.
There are several reasons for the traditional popularity of Messiah in the North: first, the choruses offer a unique blend of opportunities for great team-work and, in the many magnificent runs and crescendos, for showing off. Secondly, from the religious point of view the plain-spoken chapel-going North welcomes, perhaps subconsciously, the Protestant theology of the oratorio, the familiar words of which are all taken direct from the Bible. Thirdly, the North likes it because it knows it so well and so thoroughly just in the same way that many thousands of people like
Gilbert and Sullivan. It is said that familiarity breeds contempt, but it is impossible for anyone to have contempt for such a masterpiece as Messiah.
Part 2 of Messiah will be broadcast next Sunday at 4.15 by the Halle Society conducted by Dr. Malcolm Sargent. 
The second part of the oratorio by Handel. A performance by the Hallé Concerts Society, Isobel Baillie (soprano), Gladys Ripley (contralto), Webster Booth (tenor), Norman Walker (bass) Hallé Chorus, Hallé Orchestra – Leader, Laurance Turner, Conducted by Malcolm Sargent from a Northern concert hall.
 —————————————————————————————————-
WINTER GARDEN ORCHESTRA – Forces Programme, 9 January 1941 16.00
under the direction of Tom Jenkins with Webster Booth in a tea-time programme.
Birmingham-born Webster Booth began his professional life as an accountant. When he was eighteen he met Richard Wassell , then conductor of the City of Birmingham Orchestra, who thought highly of his voice and taught him at the Midland Institute. Booth joined the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company in 1923 and stayed with them for four years. He then settled in London, where he made a name for himself in leading stage roles and also in big musical films. He sang at Covent Garden in the International Opera Season, and has also appeared for most of the principal London and provincial choral and orchestral societies.
with Gwen Catley, Webster Booth, Appleton Moore. BBC Theatre Chorus trained by Charles Groves. BBC Theatre Orchestra  – Leader, Tate Gilder. Programme arranged, and conducted by Reginald Burston. Compere, Desmond Davis
WHAT MANCHESTER THINKS TODAY – BBC Home Service Basic, 7 May 1941 21.20A second musically illustrated review of some Manchester first nights from Tom Jones (1907) to Happy Birthday (1940). The programme compiled by S. R. Littlewood. Arranged  and produced by Gordon McConnel.
Joan Hammond, Webster Booth, Billie Baker, Bobbie Comber, The Three Radio Graces.BBC Theatre Chorus Trained by Charles Groves. BBC Theatre Orchestra – Leader, Tate Gilder, Conducted by Reginald Burston. Compere, Wilfred Pickles.
Leader, Tate Gilder, Conducted by Harold Lowe, with Webster Booth (tenor)
 When Webster Booth was eighteen he met Richard Wassell , then conductor of the City of Birmingham Orchestra, who thought highly of his voice and taught him at the Midland Institute. Booth joined the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company in 1923 and stayed with them for four years. He has sung at Covent Garden in the International Opera season, and has also appeared for most of the principal London *and provincial choral and orchestral’ societies.
THE ARTIST’S CHOICE – Forces Programme, 8 December 1941 16.55
Music chosen by Webster Booth, Sir Adrian Boult, Dennis Noble, and Egon Petri, with the reasons for their choice. Presented on gramophone records by Herbert C. Ridout.
—————————————————————————————————-
Romantic ballad opera by R. Vaughan Williams. Libretto by Harold Child. Produced by Stanford Robinson and Mark H. Lubbock BBC  Theatre Chorus, BBC Theatre Orchestra:conductor Stanford Robinson. Narrator, Dennis Arundell
The Constable: Owen Brannigan, Mary: Lorely Dyer, Aunt Jane: Gladys Palmer
John the Butcher: Dennis Noble, Hugh the Drover: Webster Booth
SINGING TO YOU – Forces Programme, 12 July 1942 15.30 Story of Webster
Booth
and his songs. Gramophone programme, compiled and written by Bettine
Rampton, and presented by Leslie Perowne
THE SHEPHERDS OF THE DELECTABLE MOUNTAINS – BBC Home Service Basic, 8 December 1942 21.40 Pastoral episode, founded upon Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, by R. Vaughan Williams. Ladies of the BBC Theatre  Chorus, BBC Theatre Orchestra – conductor, Stanford Robinson.
Produced by Stephen Thomas in collaboration with the conductor.
A pilgrim: Roy Henderson
First shepherd: Sinclair Logan
Second shepherd: Webster Booth
Third shepherd: Victor Harding
A celestial messenger: Geoffrey Dunn
Voice of a bird: Margaret Field-Hyde
Narrator: Patric Curwen.
BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA – Forces Programme, 20 December 1942 20.00
(90 players). Conductor, Sir Adrian Boult. Webster Booth (tenor)
—————————————————————————————————–
The Stuff We Gave the Troops. Programme designed to reflect the more serious side of ENSA’s musical activities-featuring some famous singers of the day, including Webster Booth and Joan Hammond.Devised by Walter Legge. Presented by the Department of National Service Entertainment (NAAFI)
SUNDAY RHAPSODY City of Music – BBC Home Service Basic, 9 July 1944 21.35
A Viennese pot-pourri by Julius Buerger, with Gwen Catley, Webster Booth, Dennis Noble (by permission of Jay Pomeroy)Winifred  Davey (solo piano).BBC  Theatre Chorus. BBC Theatre Orchestra.Conductor: Stanford Robinson. Narrator, Anthony Craxton.
Edwardian Melodies – A pot-pourri for broadcasting, arranged by Stanford Robinson, with special orchestrations by Julius Buerger and Leo Wurmser. Prelude, London chimes ; Pomp and Circumstance ; the Ballroom; Ballad Concert; Promenade and Bandstand ; Musical Comedy ; Epilogue, London chimes. Lorely Dyer. (by permission of Lee Ephraim ), Nancy Evans, Webster Booth, Stanley Pope Alfredo Campoli (solo violin). Narrator: Frederick Ranalow, BBC Theatre Orchestra : conductor,  Stanford Robinson. (BBC recording)
Stanford Robinson (conductor)
Sunday Rhapsody – THE MUSIC OF ERIC COATES – BBC Home Service Basic, 8 October 1944 22.00 A radio pot-pourri with Gwen Catley (soprano),Webster Booth (tenor), Roderick Jones (baritone) (by permission of the Administrators of Sadler’s Wells), BBC Theatre Chorus and BBC Theatre Orchestra. Conductor, Stanford Robinson.

11 October 1944 Guest stars:’KATHLEEN’ AND WEBSTER BOOTH. 

THE BRITISH BAND OF THE A.E.F. – General Forces Programme, 18 October 1944 13.00Under the direction of R.S.M. George Melachrino , with Kathleen Booth? and Webster Booth. 

George Melachrino

A jubilee tribute to the composer, with Gladys Ripley (contralto), Webster Booth (tenor) BBC Theatre Chorus and BBC Theatre Orchestra. Orchestrations by Leo Wurmser. Chorus arrangements by John Clements. Conductor, Stanford Robinson
Teresa del Riego, who wrote the music of 0 dry those tears, Thank God for a gardenHoming, and many other familiar songs, this year celebrates her fiftieth year as a composer.
Sunday Rhapsody VICTORIAN MELODIES: BBC Home Service Basic, 31 December 1944 21.30 Pot – pourri for broadcasting, arranged by Stanford Robinson, including ballroom memories, plantation songs, student songs, and ballads.
Orchestrations by Leo Wurmser. Ada Alsop , Winifride Ingham (by permission of Jay Pomeroy). Webster Booth, Frederick Harvey. Narration, written by Harold Nede and spoken by Christopher Stone. BBC Theatre Chorus and Orchestra: conductor, Stanford Robinson.
—————————————————————————————————–

 

Sunday Rhapsody –  EDWARDIAN MELODIES – BBC Home Service Basic, 11 March 1945 21.30 Produced by Gwen Williams and Stanford Robinson.Orchestrations by Julius Buerger and Leo Wurmser, with Lorely Dyer, Nancy Evans, Webster Booth, Stanley Pope, Alfredo Campoli (violin).Script  written by Desmond Davis.Narrator:Frederick Ranalow. BBC Theatre Chorus. BBC Theatre Orchestra:conductor, Stanford Robinson.

CITY OF MUSICLight Programme, 28 August 1945 13.15 A Viennese pot-pourri by Julius Buerger. with Gwen Catley, Webster Booth, William Parsons, and Winifred Davey (solo piano). BBC Theatre Chorus, and BBC Theatre Orchestra: conductor, Stanford Robinson. Narrator, Anthony Craxton. 
William Parsons (bass)
Sunday Rhapsody VICTORIAN MELODIES (No. 2) – BBC Home Service Basic, 30 December 1945 21.30A potpourri produced by Gwen Williams and Stanford Robinson , including ballroom memories, part songs, and ballads. Special orchestrations by Leo Wurmser. Wth Doris Gambell (soprano). Marjorie Thomas (contralto), Webster Booth (tenor), Norman Allin (bass).
BBC Theatre Chorus and Orchestra. Conductor. Stanford Robinson.
Narration written by Harold Neden.Programme introduced by Christopher Stone.
 
Compiled by Jean Collen 2014.
Information from The Scotsman and the BBC Genome Project.
JEAN COLLEN © 2014
Updated May 2017